Thursday, January 5, 2012

The Broken-Hearted Shearer



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I'm a broken-hearted shearer, I'm ashamed to show my face,
For the way that I've been lambed down 'tis a caution to the snakes.
I took a trip to the Forest, and round the Canobolas then
We went down around the race course and back to town again.

Then I went to get a nobbler at a certain house in town,
Where the barmaid was a caution to lamb a shearer down.
Oh she tossed me up at "Yankee Grab" to keep me on the booze,
And somehow or the other, I was always bound to lose.

Oh me trousers I have two pair, me boots is not all there,
I've a couple of pair of blankets, like meself the worse for wear,
I've a billy can, a pint pot, a bucket and jackshay.
I've a box of Cockle's Pills and a jar of Holloway.

Oh, I have sold my good old horse, and I'll get some work I hope;
I've some tea and some tobacco, and a half a bar of soap.
And that's all my five years gathering since last I left the town,
But it's nothing when you're used to it do a lambing down.


From Singabout, Volume 2, Number 4 (May 1958).  Published with the following note:


Collected by John Meredith from Tom Byrnes of Parramatta, who learned it in the Orange (NSW) district, with some additional verses from Stewart and Keesing's Old Bush Songs.


3 comments:

  1. John, what the blazes is a 'jackshay" ?

    ReplyDelete
  2. I apologise for having no idea. I will enquire of Bob Bolton who was the editor of this most wonderful publication.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Then again, no need:

    http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/jackshay


    Definition of JACKSHAY

    Austral
    : a bushman's quart pot used esp. for boiling water

    ReplyDelete